Stand-alone vs. Integration

There have been discussions in my district of moving my computer classes into more of an integration with classroom, and classroom teachers and librarian teaching much of my content due to scheduling. I am unhappy that a discussion of giving my teaching time away to others who are untrained in technology because 'its so basic at the elementary level' but I'm unhappy to lose being a teacher in my own classroom because I love working with kids. How many of you still have stand alone classrooms? For those of you who integrate, do you still feel a connection with kids or are you working mainly with adults? Positives and/or negatives of both types of jobs? I'm really torn if I want to be an integrator or go back to teaching my own group of kids in my own classroom.
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  • Unfortunately, the stand-alone computer lab is a dated model in many ways. There have been many articles since around 2012 about dissolving labs, turning them into STEM/STEAM/Innovation labs, and more. It's no coincidence that 2012 was around the time of Chromebooks starting to flood schools with 1:1 initiatives. IMO, if stand-alone technology classes are to exist going forward, they need to be centered around innovative content and not basic productivity apps and keyboarding like many are today.

    Content like coding, filmmaking, design, digital music, robotics, and of course those acronyms (STEM, STEAM, etc.) need to be the focus currently and ideally that focus should be re-examined every few years to stay current with edtech trends and career pathways. 

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